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Anderson Co. Extension Agent gives information on grasshopper control

ANDERSON CO., June 26, 2013--According to Truman Lamb, Anderson County Extension Agent, Grasshoppers are consuming large amounts of forage. No doubt, if grasshopper infestation continues it would certainly have an effect on hay production and forage production for grazing.

Attached is a list of some products currently labeled for grasshopper control in pastures and hay.  Note that some products contain the same active ingredient, but often at different concentrations, which is important when comparing prices.  Some of these are “generic” products that have entered the market once the patent expired on the original product. In some cases, the rates are the same for the generic product as for the original registered product, but this is not always the case, even when the concentration remains unchanged. Thus, check the product label for the appropriate rate.

Consecutive years of hot, dry summers and warm, dry autumns favor grasshopper survival and reproduction.  Warm, dry fall weather allows grasshoppers more time to feed and lay eggs.  Also, rains in the spring when eggs are hatching drown young hoppers and encourage fungal diseases which kill hoppers.  Thus, dry weather in the spring favors their survival. During hot, dry summers, weedy hosts dry up and grasshoppers fly in search of green plants.  The search for food can result in large numbers of grasshoppers concentrating in orchards, crops and irrigated landscapes.

Grasshopper eggs are deposited in the soil ½-2 inches deep in weedy areas, fence rows, ditches and hay fields.  The eggs hatch in the spring and early summer.  Eggs of different grasshopper species hatch out at different times, so young grasshoppers can be seen throughout the spring and early summer. Young grasshoppers, called nymphs, feed for about six weeks.  Once nymphs reach the adult stage, they can fly.  As weedy plants are consumed or dry in the summer heat, adult grasshopper can fly from weedy areas and pastures to more succulent crops and landscapes.

Grasshoppers are susceptible to many insecticides.  However, insecticides typically do not persist more than a few days and grasshoppers may soon re-invade the treated area. The length of control will depend on the use rate and residual activity of the insecticides and the frequency of retreatment.  Controlling grasshoppers over a large area will reduce the numbers which can re-infest a treated area. 

Insectides Labeled for Grasshopper Control in Pastures and Hayfields

Always read and follow all label instructions on pesticide use and restrictions.  Information below is provided for educational purposes only.  Read current label before use.  

Prevathon.  5% rynaxypyr. Prevathon was registered by DuPont for control of fall armyworm and other caterpillars in pasture and hay in 2012.  Prevathon  has a 2ee label for control of grasshoppers in pastures and hay in Texas and Oklahoma.  Prevathon has a 0 day waiting period for harvest or grazing and is not a restricted use insecticide.

Mustang Max. 9.6% zeta-cypermethrin.  Applications may be made up to 0 days for forage and hay, 7 days for straw and seed screenings.  Restricted use insecticide.

Karate Z.  13.1% lambda cyhalothrin.  Pasture and rangeland grass, grass grown for hay and silage and grass grown for seed.  Pasture and rangeland grass may be used for grazing or cut for forage 0 days after application.  Do not cut grass to be dried and harvested for hay until 7 days after the last application.  Restricted use insecticide.

Warrior II.  22.8% lambda cyhalothrin.  Pasture and rangeland grass, grass grown for hay and silage and grass grown for seed.  Pasture and rangeland grass may be used for grazing or cut for forage 0 days after application.  Do not cut grass to be dried and harvested for hay until 7 days after the last application.  Restricted use insecticide.

Lambda-Cy.  11.4% lambda cyhalothrin.  Pasture and rangeland grass, grass grown for hay and silage and grass grown for seed.  Pasture and rangeland grass may be used for grazing or cut for forage 0 days after application.  Do not cut grass to be dried and harvested for hay until 7 days after the last application.  Restricted use insecticide.

Baythroid XL.  12.07% Cyfluthrin. Pasture, rangeland, grass grown for hay and seed.  Zero days to grazing or harvesting hay.  Restricted use insecticide.

Tombstone Helios.  25% Cyfluthrin. Pasture, rangeland, grass grown for hay and seed. Zero days to grazing or harvesting hay.  Restricted use insecticide.

Dimilin 2L.  22% difulbenzuron.  Dimilin is labeled for grasshopper control for pastures, including forage which is mechanically harvested, roadsides, fence rows and other non-crop areas.  Wait one day until harvest.  Label does not list a restriction on grazing.  To be effective, Dimilin must be applied when young hoppers are about ¼- inch long.  Dimilin in not effective on adult (winged) grasshoppers.  If adults are present, add a second insecticide that is effective on adults.  Dimilin must be eaten by the grasshoppers to be effective.  Provides residual control for several weeks as long as treated forage is not removed from field.

Sevin 4F, Sevin XLR, Sevin 80S, Genric Carbaryl.  Carbaryl is the active ingredient.  When applied to pastures, there is a 14 day waiting period before grazing or harvesting.

Malathion_57% and Malathion ULV.  Zero days to harvest or grazing.    

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